Aftercare

Maintaining your products

So you have brought a lovely hand crafted wooden product and it looks great, but over time with modern homes and day to day living and handling etc. it may need a little bit of loving care every so often.  In many cases, little or no maintenance should be required.

Depending on the intended use of the item, the finish will be matched accordingly. Only items marked on their product label with the food safe logo are truly Food Safe and will after a while require a reapplication of a food safe product to restore the finish.

Some products will require replacement batteries and refills.

The following FAQ will hopefully answer any of your questions, but if the answer is not there, please do not hesitate in contacting me.

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What is a Food Safe product and how do I care for it?

Food Safe Finish is a clear food grade oil for use with salad bowls, cheese boards and other items which come into contact with foodstuffs. It dries to a soft satin finish with a high degree of water resistance.  It is however recommended not to use detergents when cleaning it as this may remove some of the oil over time.  However, it is often seen that some wooden products used with food are left natural with no finish applied, so if the oil does wear off it will not do it any harm.  Never put the item in the Dishwasher!

There are numerous products commercially available that can be used to restore the finish, such as a chopping board oil.  I hope to be able to stock a locally manufactured beeswax and mineral oil finish in the future, that once available, will be able to be purchased through my shop.

How do I clean and care for an ornamental wooden item?

As the item is made from natural materials used to being outside, our central heated homes are somewhat a tough environment for them.  Although every effort is made during the manufacturing process, from the choice of kiln dried woods to the methods used during the turning process, there still may be slight changes/distortion over time.  My recommendation is to keep it away from direct heat, i.e. sat on the top of a radiator or in direct sunshine.  Never use water on the product to clean it.

Most ornamental/sculptures have no real functional use and will be finished in a variety of products.  Care should be taken when handling and cleaning around delicate areas to prevent damage.  I use a range of Chestnut products on my work including, spray lacquers, oils, waxes and friction polish.

Lacquers are tough and hard-wearing enough that they should only really need a wipe down with a clean cloth. The use of a spray wax polish shouldn’t harm them, but a natural cream wax such as WoodWax 22 is better, although not always practical as said waxes will watermark if they come into contact with water.  Oils similarly need little attention.  Waxed items should only require a gentle polish with a soft cloth and the very occasional coat of wax over the top.

The item has been finished in sealers and natural carnauba/beeswax polish.  To restore the shine, apply a small amount of wax polish, ideally containing beeswax and gently polish to a shine.  Spray furniture polishes can be used, but I would personally recommend a normal wax polish.  The handle and spout on this item are firmly attached, but to avoid any disappointment, try to avoid picking the item up with them.

What precautions should I take when using Tea Lights, Candles and Oil Burners?

Hopefully, the following is common sense when it comes to the use of Tea Lights, Candles and Oil Burners in your homes, but legally I need to remind you.

CAUTIONS

All items designed to hold a tea light will come with a glass tea light holder. If it does not have a glass holder, do not use a tea light in the wooden product in just its metal foil casing. The metal foil can get extremely hot and can cause fires.

The wooden product will have been made to ensure it will not topple over, however, make sure it is on a flat and stable surface before lighting the tea light.

Always leave at least 10cm (four inches) between burning candles/tea lights and never place them under shelves or other enclosed spaces. Keep candles/tea lights, matches and lighters out of the reach of children and pets.

Keep candles/tea lights away from curtains, furniture and anything else that can catch fire. Keep loose clothing and hair away from candles/tea lights when they are lit.

Always put candles/tea lights out and leave to cool down before you try to move them. Always put candles/tea lights out when you are out of the room and when you go to sleep.

Use a candle ‘snuffer’ or a metal spoon to put the candle/tea light out – it is safer than blowing them out which can send sparks and hot wax flying.

With an Oil Burner, remove the glass insert from the wooden surround whilst filling to prevent spilling oil on to the wood.

Use only a low odour, good quality lamp oil and keep the wick as low as possible to avoid smoke.

How do I change the battery on a 50mm clock and what battery do I need?

The 50mm gold or chrome clock inserts are simply pushed into the wooden surround and held in place with a rubber band for a friction fit.  The wooden surround can simply be wiped with a soft cloth to restore any lost shine.

To set the time or change the battery, gently pull the clock out. Do not use a metallic item to prise the clock out as this may damage the edge of the clock surround.  Using your finger nails should be all it needs to remove it.

To set the time or to start the clock: locate the winder on the edge of the clock.  It will be obscured by the rubber band.  Pull out the winder carefully just until the hands are free to move.  If the clock has a second hand this will stop whilst the winder is out.  Rotate the winder until the desired time is set.  Once set, push the winder back in and the second hand (if fitted) will start to move.  Refit the rubber band and push the clock back into the wooden surround.  You may find rotating the clock insert slightly will enable it to sit correctly and obviously it goes without saying to make sure the 12 o clock is at the top.

Changing the battery:  This can be fiddly, so you might want to get a jeweller/watch maker to replace the battery for you. It requires a SR626SW battery.  Remove the clock as described above.  Turn over the clock to view the back.  Find the slight cut out where by using a small watchmakers screw driver the back can be prised off.  Locate the battery and replace it with a fresh battery ensuring the battery is the correct way up.  Refit the cover, reset the time and reinstall into the clock surround.

How do I change the battery on a 100mm Skeleton clock and what battery do I need?

There is no requirement to remove the clock from the wooden surround.  The wooden surround can simply be wiped with a soft cloth to restore any lost shine.

The clock is set by the Time Set dial on the rear of the clock which is simply rotated to the desired time.

To change the battery, carefully pull off the battery cover from the back of the clock.  Replace the used battery with a new AAA battery.  Ensure the (-) of the battery is fitted against the spring inside the battery compartment.  Refit the cover and reset the clock as necessary.

What refill do I need for a Bullet Pen and how do I change it?

The Bullet Pens take a Parker Style Refill readily available from your local stationary store or online.

The Bolt Action Bullet and Twist Bullet pens unscrew where the bullet meets the wood or acrylic body part.  Please see the photo of the dismantled pen in the shop.

The wooden burrs often used for the body of pens have by their nature, lots of small knots, gaps and cracks. Whilst every effort has gone into stabilising and filling any gaps in the material to prevent further cracking, they can very occasionally crack, which is totally outside my control. Should you have any problems, please do not hesitate in contacting me and I will resolve the issue.

What refill do I need for a Slimline Twist Pen and how do I change it?

The twist type pens use a standard Cross Style Refill available from most Stationary type high street shops or online. Just Google ‘Cross Style Refill’.  These type of pens tend to pull apart at the middle joint and the refills then simply unscrews.  Please see the photo of the dismantled pen in the shop.

The wooden burrs often used for the body of pens have by their nature, lots of small knots, gaps and cracks. Whilst every effort has gone into stabilising and filling any gaps in the material to prevent further cracking, they can very occasionally crack, which is totally outside my control. Should you have any problems, please do not hesitate in contacting me and I will resolve the issue.

How do I clean and care for a wooden pen?

Clean the wooden body of your pen or pencil by polishing with a dry cloth or duster.  If you find stubborn marks, use a damp cloth, but always use a dry cloth  immediately after.

The finishes used are chosen so they should last for years, but with constant handling it may eventually start to wear off.  If the surface becomes dull, polish with a small amount of beeswax, but do no not use a spray furniture polish.  do not use abrasives on the pen as it may scratch the surface.

Avoid getting it wet in the first instance, but accidents happen, so dry it out thoroughly straight away.

Do not expose to extremes of hot or cold as natural materials can change in colour and shape.

Do not leave the pen in the sun for long periods as this may cause fading or cracking.